Glycine is one of the non-essential amino acids and is used to help create muscle tissue and convert glucose into energy. It is also essential to maintaining healthy central nervous and digestive systems, and has recently been shown to provide protection via antioxidants from some types of cancer.

Glycine is used in the body to help construct normal DNA and RNA strands—the genetic material needed for proper cellular function and formation. It helps prevent the breakdown of muscle by boosting the body’s levels of creatine, a compound that helps build muscle mass. High concentrations of  glycine are found not only in the muscles, but in the skin and other connective tissues as well. Almost 1/3 of collagen, which keeps the skin and connective tissue firm and flexible, is composed of glycine. (High amounts of Glycine are also found in gelatin, which is a form of denatured collagen). Without glycine the body would not be able to repair damaged tissues; the skin would become slack as it succumbed to UV rays, oxidation, and free radical damage, and wounds would never heal.

Glycine is considered a glucogenic amino acid, which means it helps supply the body with glucose needed for energy. It helps regulate blood sugar levels, and thus glycine supplementation may be useful for treating symptoms characterized by low energy and fatigue, such as hypoglycemia, anemia, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).
Glycine is essential for a healthy, normally functioning digestive system. It helps regulate the synthesis of the bile acid used to digest fats, and is included in many commercial gastric antacid agents.

Glycine is necessary for central nervous system function. Research has shown that this amino acid can help inhibit the neurotransmitters that cause seizure activity, hyperactivity, and manic (bipolar) depression. Glycine can also be converted to another neurotransmitter, serine, as needed, and may be beneficial in the management of schizophrenia. In one study, twenty-two schizophrenic patients, who did not initially respond to traditional treatments, added glycine to their ongoing antipsychotic medication and found that it significantly reduced their symptoms. Glycine intake among the participants ranged from 40 to 90 grams daily (0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight). More research concerning the effects of glycine on schizophrenia is underway. Studies have shown that glycine also helps improve memory retrieval loss in those that suffer from a wide variety of sleep-depriving conditions, including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, jet lag, and overwork.

Results from preliminary studies of glycine as a potential treatment for cancer have been promising, and suggest that it may help prevent the development of cancerous tumors and melanoma. In laboratory mice, dietary glycine prevented tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenisis, the process by which tumors develop their own blood supply. Glycine also seems to play a role in keeping the prostate healthy. In one study, glycine was shown to help reduce the symptoms of prostatic hyperplasia in men.

High-protein foods, such as fish, meat, beans, milk, and cheese, are the best dietary sources of glycine. Glycine is also available in capsule and powder forms, and as part of many combination amino acid supplements. There have been no toxic effects associated with glycine, although some people have reported that taking this supplement causes stomach upset.

Individuals with kidney or liver disease should not consume glycine without consulting their doctor. Taking any one amino acid supplement can cause a disruption of the citric acid or Krebs cycle, and cause a build-up of nitrogen or ammonia in the body, which makes the liver and kidneys work harder to remove waste. Anyone taking antispastic drugs should consult a physician before supplementing with glycine, since it theoretically could increase the effects of these medications.

Glycine is a major promoter of muscle growth and muscle development

  • Glycine plays a key roll in the development and quality of our skeletal muscles, tissues, and structural integrity.
  • Glycine helps repair tissues.
  • Glycine is a component of glucose tolerance factor (GTF) and of the enzyme glutathione. Found in high concentrations in the skin and connective tissues, it is useful for repairing damaged tissues and promoting healing
  • Glycine speeds the healing of wounds.
  • Glycine is a factor in prostate health.
  • Glycine is an HGH releaser in amounts of 2 grams or more. ◦3 - 8 grams per day will maximize HGH releaser benefits. (200mg when injected)
  • Glycine is essential for synthesis of nucleic acids, bile acids, and other nonessential amino acids within the body.  

According to the book, "Anabolic Primer," glycine is best known for its effects on your nervous system. Glycine affects the production of brain neurotransmitters, which are essential for maintaining normal brain function and emotions. Glycine supplementation may also help treat symptoms associated with sleep deprivation. In a 2007 study published in the journal "Sleep and Biological Rhythms," investigators found that glycine supplementation improved both subjective and objective measures of sleep quality in patients who experienced continuously unsatisfactory sleep.

Available in the following sizes;

  • L-Glycine 50mg/ml 10mL- $35
  • L-Glycine 50mg/ml 30mL- $60

All supplies and instructions will be shipped with each order

What are Amino-Acids and why are they important?

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